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  • COVID19_HopeIsContagious_FB_081821-01

    Trusted Messengers

    Help us stop the spread of COVID-19 in Pierce County

    Our community needs your leadership to encourage vaccination and decrease cases of COVID-19 in Pierce County. 

    People trust who they know. You can help us remind people in your social networks to practice healthy habits.

    We have campaigns that use humor, responsibility, compassion and hope to deliver important public health messages:

    Residents love the campaigns, but we need your help to reach more people!

    Testimonials

    Kirk and Andrew Heinz of Kirk’s Pharmacy

    Kirk and his son, Andrew, are the co-owners of Kirk’s Pharmacies in Eatonville and Puyallup. They play an important role in their community as trusted sources of information. They also played an important role in getting people vaccinated early in the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 2 years into the COVID-19 pandemic, Kirk and Andrew say they’re not done helping to get people vaccine. 

    Ruby and Dr. Matt, kid and vaccine expert

    We know vaccines are safe and effective for children, but 6-year-old Ruby has some questions she needs answered. Her mom works for the Health Department and let her sit down with our expert, Dr. Matt Brignall, to hear firsthand why everyone eligible for a vaccine needs to get one.

    Daniel Burdsall and Threandranna Allen, Community Engagement 

    Our Community Engagement team connects with people and businesses all over Pierce County.

    During a recent trip to Parkland and Spanaway we answered questions and helped share COVID-19 info.

    Jay Brower, Bethel School District 

    “It’s really vital that we go into some of the resource deserts of our county to make sure people are empowered with knowledge and information and services,” Bethel School District’s Jay Brower said. 

    Bethel School District and Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department have a long history of working together. The COVID-19 pandemic has strengthened the bond. 

    Liz Lewis, Respiratory Therapist 

    A respiratory therapist in COVID-19 gear looks at camera.

    Respiratory therapist Liz Lewis wishes unvaccinated people could step into her shoes. Even for a day. Lewis’ telling of a COVID-19 ICU unit reminds us the pandemic is far from over.

    “If only I could take them into the ICU for a day,” Lewis said. “They could see what happens in a COVID ICU. It’s gut-wrenching.”

    Suzanne Pak, Korean Women’s Association

    Making people feel welcome can make a huge difference in increasing vaccinations. Suzanne Pak says, “It’s important to treat people with good intent” when talking about vaccine and getting them the right medical care.

    That starts with creating a sense of community.

    Dr. John Vassall, Tacoma-Pierce County Black Collective member

    “Don’t deal with someone who isn’t going to respect you and don’t deal with a system that isn’t treating you properly.”

    Dr. John Vassall understands where fear of vaccines comes from. He also wants everyone to take their own health seriously and get the care they deserve.

    Charnay DuCrest, Community Health Worker 

    “A patient will feel like they have it figured out, and then their car breaks down or someone gets sick. One thing changes, and all the blocks fall because they’re not able to get those support services.”  

    Community Health Worker Charnay DuCrest discusses how COVID-19 makes it even harder for many to get medication for Opioid Use Disorder.

    Hugh McMillan, longtime Key Peninsula resident 

    “I go back a couple of years, as you know. And I remember as a 6-year-old, our country got whacked—as did the world—with a funny thing called polio.” 

    95-year-old WWII veteran Hugh McMillan remembers when everyone got behind the polio vaccine.

    He wants the same for COVID-19. 

    Levi Miller, Homebuilder

    Like thousands of parents across Pierce County, Graham-area homebuilder Levi Miller took what he called a ‘calculated risk’ sending his unvaccinated kids back to school this fall. 

    “We’re just hoping that with all the precautions in place and us being vaccinated it’s going to work,” Miller said. “But it’s definitely nerve-racking because you hear all the stories. We don’t want our kids to suffer.” 

    Miller knows the pain of COVID-19 firsthand. In the summer of 2020, he spent 6 days in the hospital with severe symptoms from the virus. He had never been so sick. 

    Dianna Sullivan, Boys & Girls Club Director 

    Dianna Sullivan is the director of family support for Boys & Girls Club of South Puget Sound. She lives in Midland, where her kids attend Franklin Pierce School District. 

    Dianna stresses the importance of getting vaccinated for not only those who are eligible, but for those who aren’t as well. 

    “Kids under 12 that can’t get vaccinated. We’re seeing numbers rise, and to me that’s a no-go,” she said. “We’ve got to protect our children. They lean on the adults in the community to do so.” 

    Jackie Epperson, Chroma Salon owner 

    Remember those 3 months in 2020 when no one could get a haircut? Jackie Epperson sure does.

    “We thought it was going to be for 2 weeks,” she said. “We ended up being closed for eleven and a half weeks.”

    She doesn’t want to see that again. With case counts and hospitalizations recently reaching new highs in Pierce County, she’s urging anyone eligible to get vaccinated.

    Derek Young, Board of Health Chair 

    Derek Young knows the impact of COVID-19 on our community and wants to put the pandemic behind us. 

    Whether you live on the Key Peninsula or elsewhere, access, time and convenience are still keys to getting many folks vaccinated. 

    “It’s not always opposition to the vaccine,” Young said. “I was ready to walk over broken glass to get mine and yet it still took me about a week-and-a-half before I found time that was going to work.” 

    Daniel Johnson, Harbor Hope Center 

    Harbor Hope Center’s Daniel Johnson says non-profits need to stay nimble during COVID-19. And they need the community’s help more than ever.  

    “It sounds cliché to say that but there’s really a lot of people in the community who are determined to see that there are no neighbors with unmet needs.” 

    Zac Duris, St. Joseph Medical Center ICU Nurse

    “Many of my really sick patients haven’t gotten the vaccine,” says ICU Nurse Zac Duris. That’s why they’re in the COVID ICU.”

    Duris describes the heartbreaking reality of the Delta Variant and who it impacts most. 

    Blake Merwin, Gig Harbor Fly Shop owner

    “Society really functions when we care for other people,” says Gig Harbor Fly Shop owner Blake Merwin. “So that’s the position we took.”

    Merwin couldn’t anticipate the changes a global pandemic would make to his small business. But he always keeps his customers’ safety his No. 1 priority. 

    Dr. Peñalver, Community Health Care in Lakewood

    “The decision to get vaccinated is an individual one,” says Dr. Stephanie Peñalver from Community Health Care in Lakewood. “I think that’s where having a primary care provider or physician that you trust is probably the most important aspect.” 

    Dr. Peñalver says it’s important to listen to people’s concerns and work through those respectfully. That’s what she tries to do every day. 

    Asst. Chief Russ McCallion, East Pierce Fire and Rescue  

    East Pierce Fire and Rescue Assistant Chief Russ McCallion has seen nearly 20 of his members infected with COVID-19.

    That’s why he’s asking everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated. 

    “We don’t care about the politics,” McCallion said. We want people to follow the medicine and the science. We’d like people to get vaccinated because it’s the best thing to do.”

    Dr. Michael Alston, Kaiser Permanente in Tacoma

    Got questions about COVID-19 vaccine?

    “Try and include us in that conversation,” Dr. Michael Alston from Kaiser Permanente in Tacoma said.

    “We want to have the opportunity to sit with you, maybe offer you something you might not have heard about and offer you resources that help you in making this choice.” 

    Dr. Bill Roes, Key Medical Center

    Dr. Bill Roes has practiced family medicine on the Key Peninsula for 40 years. Lately, he’s been working hard to get everyone who is eligible in the community vaccinated for COVID-19.

    “I reassure patients that no, this is not some fly-by-night thing. These vaccines have been thoroughly studied both at the state level and the national level.”

    Dr. Prakash Gatta, MultiCare Health System

    Vaccine is “similar to wearing a seatbelt.”

    In fact, COVID-19 vaccine is even more effective at saving lives. That’s why Dr. Prakash Gatta at MultiCare Health System in Tacoma tells his patients to get vaccinated. 

    “It’s normal to be skeptical, but it’s also done for the greater good. You’re being a responsible citizen.” 

    Toby Joseph, Executive Director at Consultants for Indian Progress

    Toby Joseph knows people who have died from COVID-19.  He also knows many are skeptical of the government and vaccines.  

    “I absolutely believe there’s this place where science and spirituality meet,” he said. “There’s a point where I say, ‘OK. I’ve done my praying and looked at the science.’ And as scared as I am given so many historical slights to Native Americans, me and my family all elected to get the shot.”

    Dr. Carrie Jenner, pediatrician at Virginia Mason Franciscan Health

    “By getting as many kids vaccinated as we can, we’re going to get them back into the classrooms safely.”

    Dr. Carrie Jenner is a pediatrician in University Place. Every day, she sees the toll that the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on kids.

    She also suffered severely from COVID-19 last year. That’s why she tells all her patients who are eligible to get the vaccine.

    Michele Johnson, Pierce College Chancellor

    “I’m looking forward to impromptu conversations, running into people in the hallway, saying hello, getting hugs, and feeling like you can connect personally with individuals.”

    Pierce College Chancellor Michele Johnson knows COVID-19 vaccine is key to getting college life back on track, and she wants others to feel the same protection she does as more on-campus activities resume.

    Dr. Mike Myint, Physician Executive at MultiCare

    Vaccination offers about 5 to 10 times higher levels of protection than remaining antibodies from a previous COVID-19 infection, Dr. Mike Myint says.

    Most importantly, “It does protect against variant strains that we’re seeing in our community.”

    With the Delta variant spreading rapidly in Pierce County, the best thing you can do to protect yourself, your family and your community is get vaccinated today.

    Dr. Neena Chawla, Sound Family Medicine

    Dr. Neena Chawla is an internal medicine physician at Sound Family Medicine in Bonney Lake where she talks to patients every day about COVID-19 vaccine. The most frequent question she gets asked is, “Are COVID-19 vaccines really safe?”

    Dr. Chawla’s answer is always the same.  “Yes!” 

    “I trust the CDC and the FDA to approve a vaccine that would be safe for the community,” she said. “We have looked into the side effects of the vaccine as to what the severity is and how rare they are. And after looking at all the research, we have found that [it’s] quite safe for the community.”

    Dr. Sean Stout, Doctor with Sound Family Medicine

    Dr. Sean Stout works at Sound Family Medicine in Puyallup.

    Perception is important, he says. That’s why he shares his experiences with anyone who’ll listen.

    “One of the biggest struggles I see with my patients and with the society in general with COVID-19 is perspective,” he said.

    “Our perspective, a lot of times determines our reality and how we live.”

    Kim Schrier, U.S. Congresswoman

    U.S. Rep. Kim Schrier recently joined our homebound vaccination team to help administer COVID-19 vaccine to people who can’t easily leave their homes.

    She encourages everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated and help put the pandemic behind us.

    “I would call it a miracle, but it’s not a miracle because science has worked,” she said.

    Kelly Busey, Gig Harbor Police Chief

    “Get vaccinated, relax and get back to living.”

    Gig Harbor Police Chief Kelly Busey is ready to put much of this past year behind us. He sees COVID-19 vaccine as the key.

    When people in the community ask him about vaccines, he tells them to “learn more about it,” he said. “Hopefully, you can become more comfortable with the vaccine and just continue to work toward a safe community.”

    Naomi Wilson, Health Department Community Assessment Manager

    A new way to celebrate a 12th birthday—getting vaccinated!

    Naomi Wilson says after she got her COVID-19 vaccine, she still couldn’t breathe a full sigh of relief, because her kids weren’t eligible.

    That’s why on her daughter’s 12th birthday, she took her to get her first vaccine dose. Now she says her family can do normal things together again.

    Jeff Boulet, physician assistant at White River Family Care

    Jeff Boulet got COVID-19 early in the pandemic and still hasn’t fully recovered. He’s talked to many people who have concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine and answers their questions. Some still choose not to get vaccinated. He’s even lost patients to COVID who chose not to get vaccinated.

    “That’s the kind of sad stories you hear that really hit home.” He’s asking his patients—and you—to get vaccinated as soon as possible. 

    Anne Dillon, Health Department Project Manager

    As family dinners and other friendly outings return, so do important conversations with good friends.

    Anne used just such an occasion recently to answer questions her friend had about COVID-19 vaccines.

    “I was never against it, I just needed to talk it out with someone who could give me real facts,” her friend said after getting vaccinated. “I don’t want to miss out on anything. I’m here for the party.”

    Scott Engle, Puyallup Police Chief

    “When the opportunity arose to get vaccinated, I didn’t hesitate,” said Puyallup Police Chief Scott Engle.

    “I hope our residents continue to get vaccinated,” he said. “It’s a good thing for Puyallup. It’s a good thing for East Pierce County. It’s how we are going to get out of this pandemic. I really believe that.”

    Mike Curto, Tacoma Rainiers broadcaster

    “I got the shot as soon as I qualified and was able to make an appointment. It was really important to me not to pass the disease off to my relatives.”

    Tacoma Rainiers broadcaster Mike Curto got vaccinated for COVID-19 to protect himself and his family.

    Now he’s enjoying the return of baseball, road trips and removing his mask wherever it is appropriate.

    Edlyn Glover, homebound vaccination team

    You can get a vaccine in the comfort of your own home. Our homebound vaccine team will bring doses to your home to get you and those around you vaccinated.

    Edlyn Glover wants you to do your research, talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions then give us a call so we can bring vaccines to you. 

    Not only can you schedule an appointment for yourself, but our nurses can bring extra doses for your friends, family and neighbors, too—all at one location.

    Joe Stortini, former county executive and restaurateur

    Joe Stortini is known as the name behind one of Pierce County’s most popular Italian restaurants, but he’s had a lot of jobs in his 88 years.

    The politician in him wants to see partisan fighting put aside for public safety. The former restaurant owner wants Pierce County businesses to thrive again. His years spent as a history teacher give him confidence that Pierce County can unite and overcome any problem in our path including a pandemic.

    “It all starts with us,” he said. “We need everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated for COVID-19.”

    Kurt Grimmer, PenMet Parks board member

    Kurt Grimmer is a people person. He can’t help but chat up anyone in earshot.

    Thanks to the vaccine, he’s striking up conversations in public again—and hopes you’ll do the same

    “I just highly encourage people to get vaccinated for COVID-19,” he said. “That’s the quickest way to get back to normal and get your life thriving again. You’ll just be so happy. When you get that second shot and then 2 weeks have passed, you’re just going to be elated. I’ve seen it so many times.”

    Rinn Cronin Kleinman, youth engagement coordinator

    “A lot of the time what you need to do is just ask youth what they feel they need. What do you need to be successful? What can I do to support you?”

    Rinn Cronin Kleinman helps connect children and adolescents with important resources, including COVID-19 vaccine.

    She finds listening to be an effective way to break down barriers. 

    Dr. Nathan Schlicher, President of the Washington State Medical Association 

    Dr. Schlicher treats COVID-19 patients daily, and he’s concerned not enough eligible people in Pierce County are getting vaccinated. 

    “I’ve lived the past year-plus caring for people on the front lines of this pandemic and I’ve seen the devastation COVID-19 brings.”

    “I encourage folks to move it up on their list of priorities. Drive-thru somewhere and get vaccinated. Set up a time at a local pharmacy or with your doctor. Whatever it takes! Get it done in the next month or so and get back to enjoying summer!”

    Yuni Medlin, Goodwill Rental Assistance Program Manager 

    Yuni Medlin is not a fan of needles or getting shots, but she got vaccinated for COVID-19 for her mother and those around her. Now she wants you to do the same.

    After getting a single dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine a few weeks back, Medlin feels safer and more protected in all her interactions—whether flying out of state or serving the community face-to-face.

    “I started to realize I could be afraid every day about contracting COVID-19 and let that consume me,” she said. “Or I could get the vaccine and maybe be concerned for a bit but then say, ‘Whew, I’m in the clear and I feel better now.’”

    Ryan Divish, Seattle Mariners reporter

    “Imagine the worst hangover of your life and there’s nothing you can do to get rid of it. That’s what I had for four days.”

    Seattle Mariners reporter Ryan Divish found a new appreciation for friends, family, baseball and Tacoma after he got COVID-19 along with his dad and uncle.

    That’s why he got vaccinated and wants you to do the same.

    Elodia Andres Cornelio, Health Department Community Engagement

    You never know who is going to be the person to get through to someone on the fence about the vaccine. And it doesn’t even need to be anything as formal as a Health Department blog post.

    Just a conversation you have with your friends and loved ones can mean the difference between whether they get vaccinated or not. 

    Do you know anyone who is waiting to get vaccinated? Talk to them. Tell them your story. Be their trusted messenger! 

    Jim Kopriva, City of Lakewood communications manager

    Jim Kopriva is the communications manager for the City of Lakewood. He’s looking forward to getting back to pre-pandemic living.

    That’s why he got vaccinated for COVID-19.

    “It’s got very little to do with me, frankly. It’s the least I can do for my society to take a safe vaccine. I’m just thankful it’s available so soon—thank goodness for 21st century science.”

    Serrita Daniels, Health Department call center team member

    Meet Serrita Daniels. She and the rest of our call center team is standing by 7 days a week to give you guidance about COVID-19 testing locations and where to get vaccinated.

    “You can hear the relief in people’s voice when we tell them, ‘Don’t worry. We can bring the vaccine to you,’” she said.

    They can also share resources on where to find assistance with food, finances, or rental help. Call them today at (253) 649-1412. 

    Pastor Gregory Christopher, Shiloh Baptist Church and Tacoma Ministerial Alliance

    Pastor Gregory Christopher has a plan to get us all back to pre-pandemic living. It starts with getting everyone eligible vaccinated for COVID-19. 

    “The hope is getting back to a quality of life that we were accustomed to and not only with our physical health but being able to keep a roof over our heads,” he said. “Being able to get our children back in school.

    “All those things play out in who we are as a whole person. Everything rides from my perspective on getting everybody vaccinated.”

    Kathy and Ellie Weymiller, mother and daughter

    Ellie Weymiller is a 16-year-old junior at Gig Harbor High School.

    She got vaccinated for COVID-19 to protect her mom and dad, and to help put the pandemic behind us.

    “There was always kind of a fear that if I went out somewhere, I may bring COVID home. But now knowing that I can get vaccinated fully too, it just makes everything so much better.”

    Bryan Robinson, Curtis High School baseball coach

    Curtis high school baseball coach Bryan Robinson got vaccinated for COVID-19 with hope for fewer restrictions on the field and safer family visits off it.

    He still remembers the exact day spring sports were shut down in 2020 and he wants to do everything he can to make sure nothing like that happens again.

    “Just try to remember what life was like back in 2019. And if it means getting the vaccine to get back to that, it’s a pretty easy decision.”

    Guadalupe Perez-Delores and Karah Ritter, Daffodil Princesses

    We’ve all had to adjust in many ways because of the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve lost out on holiday gatherings, community events and annual traditions.

    The Daffodil Festival is doing everything it can to keep its tradition alive, and these two princesses are working to spread the word that COVID-19 vaccine is our best chance to get back on track.

    “I’m starting to hear more about people in my grade getting vaccinated, but it’s not nearly half of the students,” Guadalupe said. “I feel like if more people hear our stories about how we’ve gotten the vaccine and it’s not that bad, I think they’ll be more encouraged to get it, too.”

    Aaron Graham, Health Department Mass Vaccination Clinic Coordinator

    “Every time I give a shot, I tell people ‘Thank You!’ because I know the vaccine is not only for themselves, but it’s for the people around them. It’s for people they have never even met.”

    Meet Aaron Graham. He’s been an Army medic, phlebotomist, beekeeper and apprentice electrician. He joined Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department as a volunteer and is now our mass vaccination clinic coordinator.

    He wants everyone who is eligible in Pierce County to get vaccinated for COVID-19 and help put this pandemic behind us. 

    Ross Filkins, Peninsula athletic director/football coach

    Friday Night Lights were a little dimmer this year.

    Peninsula head football coach Ross Filkins wants everybody eligible to get vaccinated for COVID-19 so we can pack the stands again this fall.

    “I did not hesitate to get vaccinated,” he said. “Going back to last spring and seeing what happened to the Class of 2020 and shutting down all these events. We should all be doing all we can to get through this and be able to support these kids.”

    Jani Hitchen, Board of Health Member

    Jani Hitchen got vaccinated for COVID-19 for those who can’t.
    The Tacoma-Pierce County Board of Health member who represents Pierce County Council’s 6th District got her first shot of Moderna vaccine on Vax Day for several reasons. But at the top of her list, was concern for those who are unable to get the vaccine themselves.

    “If you’re 16-25 years old and you’re just putting it off, keep your family, the people you work around and your teachers in mind,” Hitchen said.

    Tory Green, Tacoma Fire Chief

    Tacoma Fire Chief Tory Green is a hugger

    “I just miss being around people,” he said. “Whether it’s at work or after hours or at a community gathering—I miss the ability to have conversations face-to-face. To have those interactions, to me—that’s the juice of life.”

    That’s why Chief Green got vaccinated for COVID-19. He wants to get back out in the community safely. He wants to socialize with his friends and family. He wants everyone in Pierce County to be able to gather and live social lives.

    Dave Morell, Board of Health Member 

    Dave Morell wants to see his grandkids again.

    He also wants to travel freely around the state and country. And he wants all of Pierce County’s struggling businesses to get back to 100% capacity.

    That’s why he got vaccinated against COVID-19, and he wants you to do the same.

    Colette August, program manager at Tahoma Indian Center

    Colette and her staff provides resources for people experiencing homelessness and other barriers on the Eastside of Tacoma.

    They hand out meals and help with laundry. They send and receive mail. They help folks get what they need to survive. Earlier this month, that meant COVID-19 vaccine.

    “I know people who have had COVID and are dealing with a lot of symptoms months later,” Colette said.  “Hair loss, lung issues—these are happening. In my mind, whatever side-effects you have from the vaccine are less than anything from the actual virus.” 

    Shauna Weatherby, MultiCare Nurse Practitioner 

    Shauna Weatherby believes strongly in all vaccines. She’s focused on women’s health at MultiCare in Tacoma and has worked in public health in Pierce County for 40 years. 

    When it was her turn to get vaccinated for COVID-19, she was “first in line.”

    “I’ve always been on the frontline, advocating for healthcare,” she said. “Especially in communities of color.”

    Jeff Sellers, Wilkeson Mayor

    Mayor Sellers had his eye on the future when he got his COVID-19 vaccine shot at our Sumner drive-thru clinic.

    Vaccines are our best hope to get back to normal life. 

    “I just want to get back to living,” Mayor Sellers said. “Not be afraid to go places and not have this restriction of a mask. Get back to what it used to be!”

    Leah Ford, Health Department Community Engagement

    Leah was too busy working on our COVID-19 response to worry about the knock at her front door earlier this year. Then she looked out the window and saw who it was. 

    “Grandma’s outside!” she called to her kids.

    What followed was a surprise reunion that left many of us misty-eyed and provided hope for the bright future vaccines will help bring about. 

    “We need to vaccinate everyone who is eligible as soon as possible,” Leah said. “But it’s especially important to reach Black, Latinx and other marginalized communities.”

    Tony Ohrazda, Health Department Project Manager 

    Tony works on our COVID-19 response and volunteers as an EMT. That means he spends countless hours helping us fight the pandemic—and often cares for people suffering from COVID-19 during his free time.

    “I’ve thought about this vaccine just about every day for the last year,” Tony said. “I promise you don’t want COVID. I protected myself and my family the moment I was able. You should do the same.”

    Tony’s EMT work placed him in vaccination Phase 1A.

    Steve Korst, community member

    Steve is married to Carolyn, who works in our Human Resources Department. Carolyn snapped this picture of Steve getting his second dose of the Moderna vaccine.

    Health issues made Steve especially vulnerable to COVID-19, and he’s looking forward to all the things he can do now that he’s fully vaccinated.

    “I wanted it because I have COPD and asthma, and I know that puts me at high risk. Our children and grandchildren have not visited because they don’t want to expose me to COVID. I want to feel free to see family, and go places again.”

    Gabbie Hubbard, Health Department planner 

    Before COVID-19 hit Pierce County, Gabbie worked on our emergency responses to things like Hepatitis A and measles outbreaks. But in the last year, she played a key role in many different aspects of our COVID-19 work like testing and contact tracing.

    She was able to get vaccinated because she coordinates staff and volunteers at our vaccination events.

    “Being able to get vaccinated was special for me and the team I work with,” Gabbie said. “It means the volunteers and staff who work face-to-face with our communities are protected and can help the people they serve!”

    Thanks for all your hard work protecting Pierce County, Gabbie!

    Kimberly Ritchie, Health Department Drug Addiction Counselor 

    Kimberly works in our treatment services program. She’s provided hope and support to people seeking a way out of addiction since 2016.

    Because she works directly with a high-risk population, she received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine in February.

    “The people I serve have been diagnosed with addiction issues and many struggle with homelessness. Addiction and homelessness come with a whole slew of health concerns and risks.”

    Her own health was also a concern. “I wanted to be vaccinated as soon as I was eligible. Although I quit smoking seven years ago, I was recently diagnosed with COPD. I just want to make sure everybody is protected!”

    Trusted Messengers

    Elected Officials

    Catherine Ushka
    Board of Health
    Vice Chair
    Tacoma City Council

    Derek Young
    Board of Health Chair
    Pierce County Council

    John Hines
    Council Member
    City of Tacoma

    Keith Blocker
    Board of Health Member
    Tacoma City Council

    Dave Morell
    Board of Health Member
    Pierce County Council

    Victoria Woodards
    Mayor
    City of Tacoma

    Community Leaders

    Tamar Jackson
    Director of Comm. Engagement
    Workforce Central

    Sue Dreier
    CEO
    Pierce Transit

    Rhubarb
    Tacoma Rainiers

    Layla Isaac
    Business Owner
    Ice Cream Social

    Rachi Wortham
    TCC Men’s
    Basketball Coach

    Sue Kidd
    Dine Pierce County

    Marilee
    Hill-Anderson

    Sumner-Bonney Lake School District

    Shallae Hobbs
    Tacoma
    Public Schools Nurse

    Erin Jones
    Education Leader

    Shareable resources

    Use these resources and remind people you care about to protect their community.

    Some of them are funny. Some of them are edgy. All of them show you care about the people around you and want them to be safe. 

    I feel the need… the need for vaccine!
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    Name a healthy habit.
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    Set phasers to vax.
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    Vaccinate and travel.
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    Everybody gets a vaccine!
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    More than 100,000
    people vaccinated.

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    Chillin’ out vaxin’
    relaxin’ all cool.

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    Be my vaccine-tine.
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    Phased and confused?
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    Parks and vaccination.
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    Vax to the future.
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    2020: Nope. 2021: Hope!
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    Mask up, Pierce County!

    Some bunny loves you.
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    Protect your peeps.
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    Hasta la vista, COVID.
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    Wear a mask. This is the way.
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    Pandemic? Inconceivable!
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    Show your love. Mask up!
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    Thank you for being a friend.
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    COVID-19 is among us.
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    I wear a mask for Nana.
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    Wearing is caring.
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    Say it. Don’t spray it.
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    Celebrate in style.
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    Don’t half mask it.
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    Masked potatoes and gravy.
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    Wear. The. Face mask.
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    I wear a mask for _____.
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    Resting mask face.
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    Don’t be a mask-hat.
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    Small action. Big difference.
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    Mask-aroni and cheese.
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    Protecting is respecting.
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    My mask will go on.
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    Face improvement project.
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    Orange you glad I wore a
    face mask.

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    Love your neighbor.
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    Your two best friends.
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    Masketball season.
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    Don’t expose; cover your nose.
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    An intentional act of kindness.
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    Protect your office.
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    Pumpkin Spice Mask.
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    Don’t leave home without it.
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    Just another corny mask message.
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    Protect your friends.
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    Wearing a mask is boo-tiful.
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    Mask the way I like it.
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    Not just a bunch of Hocus Pocus.
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    The scariest costume of them all.
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    Mask your dome.
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    Mona Lisa’s mask.
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    Practice Safe Six

    Six is the new fore.
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    Practice Safe Six.
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    A cornucopia of tools.
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    Now that’s what I call 6FT.
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    Physical distancing is a beach.
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    Physical distancing is in-tents.
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    Turn it up.
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    Stay in the mix.
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    Donut stand so close to me.
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    Party like it’s 2020.
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    Like a good neighbor, show that you care.
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    Aloe from the other side.
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    Carve out 6 feet.
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    Physical distancing shucks.
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    Vampires and zombies and COVID. Oh my!
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    Happy trails.
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    Enjoy the park and play apart.
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